Growing New Talents for Indonesia’s Creative Industry

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3284,3283,3282,3281,3280,3279″ layout=”3″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]All of the most cutting-edge technologies in the 21st century never cease to amaze us. Despite our perpetual fascination about technology,  technology is also ‘accused’ of being the culprit of human decadence, arguing that technology products have rendered us less humane.

In its most recent students’ artworks exhibition titled “Projects 69”, Visual Communication Design (VCD) Study Program of Sampoerna University proposed a counterintuitive angle to the issue of human-technology relations.

The exhibition was officiated by Sampoerna University Rector Dr. Wahdi Yudhi. He extended his acknowledgment of students’ hard work, saying,” I appreciate your creativity very much. Do your best, not only for today but also for your future.”

Humane Technology

“We believe that through technology, humans can be more humane. VR, motion interactive and all artworks we have here are in essence about human interactions with technology,” said Maria Wahyuni, the VCD lecturer in charge of the exhibition which was officially opened on Wednesday (5/15/2019) at VCD Creativity Center, on the 7th floor of L’Avenue Building, Jakarta.

Sixty-nine (69) has an interesting underlying philosophy. “It is a magical number for us. It means ‘to give and to get’. Six means this year marks our university’s 6th anniversary. And nine is the summation of Sampoerna magic number (2, 3 and 4),” she continued.

On the same occasion, Visual Communication Design (New Media) Study Program Head Tombak Matahari, M. Ds. congratulated all of the students involved in the exhibition. He encouraged VCD students to be ready and open to any opportunities of cooperating with industry players as this may result in potential partnerships, collaboration and so forth.

Growing Talents

The types of artworks showcased in Projects 69 vary. The 24 works encompassed the realm of Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Motion Interactives Technology, design installation, e-publishing, games and mobile applications.

Of all these, both VR and AR are projected to experience exponential growth in years ahead. The world’s AR industry is expected to reach US$133 billion by 2021. Meanwhile, Virtual Reality is expected to only reach US$75 billion. AR technology is valuated higher as it needs no additional tools. Thus, people find it easier to adopt and implement.

Keeping this in mind, Sampoerna University’s Visual Communication Design study program includes AR as an element of the curriculum for its students. The new media element in the curriculum is expected to help grow new talents to fulfill the every growing industry demands.

Maria added that at this stage the lesson emphasizes on a mastery of good and proper narration concepts.

“Millenials are so accustomed to interacting with their gadgets. And now they want more from technology. They desire hyper-reality by being part of the technology. This is why there is a growing number of AR enthusiasts recently,” she commented in an interview with CNN Indonesia.[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/sYeR_tEpuX0?list=PLmriyx1tVZAxio48Al6AIeoCww_3MmTuk” el_width=”70″ align=”center”][vc_column_text]Daring to Go Beyond Boundaries

Students freely blend not only arts and technology but also concepts from other disciplines. This makes the exhibition rich with bold ideas.

Rifai Dwi Cahyo and his independent project “The Homunculus” (Latin: “a little man”), for example, combine 3-dimensional printing technology, history, alchemy history, and psychoanalysis theory.

“I created a number of figurines, showing the inner psyche and nature of human beings. The inspiration derived from tales of alchemists in the European Middle Age and borrowed Sigmund Freud’s theory to conceptualize the idea,” he explained.

Another childhood-memory- provoking installation is dubbed “Nostalgic 90”. According to team leader Wahyu Mahendra, the artwork presented the golden era of Indonesian children’s games in the 1990s which are now getting obsolete.

This interdisciplinary way of thinking is taught at Sampoerna University because in the future, challenges are a lot more complex than they are now. And a more comprehensive, transdisciplinary approach is required to generate better solutions.

The exhibition is open from the 15th, 2019 to 22nd of May 2019, during office hours (9.00 AM – 4.00 PM). It is free of charge and public visitors are welcome. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Learning ‘Secrets’ to a Profitable Business Idea

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3267,3266,3265,3264″ layout=”4″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]At Sampoerna University, we educate young minds to acquire various hard and soft skills. With these skills, they are better prepared to be whatever they want to be in the future to contribute to the nation’s advancement.

One of many ways to achieve this is to create jobs not only for him/herself but also for many other people. This is why we encourage our students to launch their own startups or business ideas.

In the preparation for the upcoming “Kompetisi Bisnis Mahasiswa Indonesia” (KBMI) this year, Sampoerna University through its Student Affairs Department invited Dr. Wachyu Hari Haji on Monday (5/13/2019). He was speaking at Sampoerna University campus to provide guidance and hacks for our students to win the national business competition held annually by the State Ministry for Research and Technology and Higher Education (Kemenristek Dikti).

In front of a number of students eager to join this year’s KBMI, Dr. Wachyu shared his tips and tricks.

One recipe for a thriving, sustainable new business a noble purpose. “It’s an ultimate goal that your business will benefit people and be the spark of other people’s lives so when life gives us hard times and business seems going down, we can stand as we believe that our business is not about us but about other people’s who put their lives in it,” he elaborated.

“Find a team that shares your noble purpose. they have similar passion types of expertise so all of you can complement each other,” he said.

The next is to find a business topic that determines a specific target of customers. This is because a business should not serve a customer segment which is too broad. A specific target helps the business focus better on solving problems.

“Then you should find and choose which customer problems to solve,” Wachyu told them. “Solutions are given in the form of products or services that are believed to be able to solve potential customers’ problems.”

While starting a business, they are also advised not to forget setting success indicators. “These indicators must be set in every key activity,” Wachyu added.

And when the time is right, launch your products or services in the right market, advised the entrepreneurship independent consultant and judge of KBMI.

“We don’t need to wait for a huge capital in order to set up a business. We can start a small thing as long as we think big and move fast. Think BIG, start SMALL, move FAST,” the head of Entrepreneurship Center at Universitas Mercu Buana Jakarta said.

For students, the workshop offered a lot of practical insights and knowledge. They not only can prepare for the competition but also for getting a better understanding as to where and how to start a business. It allowed them to analyze thoroughly and improve existing business plan and processes.

KBMI is a business plan competition that aims to support Indonesian students’ business ideas development. The facility is provided as the form of financial support from the Ministry and business mentoring by universities. This year, all participants are to submit their business plans not later than May 15th, 2019. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Raises Awareness Of Women’s Role In Advancing Education

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3146,3145,3144,3143″ layout=”4″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]The history of women in education has been vast and substantial yet still underappreciated. In recorded history, women’s role began to be acknowledged in 19th century America. As Christine A. Woyshner and Bonnie Hao Kuo Tai stated in “The History of Women in Education” Symposium in 1997, women started to “play central roles in education” in the 1800s. They worked as teachers and learners both in informal and formal settings throughout the U.S.

In Indonesia, Raden Ajeng Kartini had begun a women emancipation movement through education more than a century ago. Another prominent figure in Indonesia’s education is Ki Hajar Dewantara who was the first Minister of National Education and widely known for pioneering education for marginalized commoners with his Taman Siswa school.

To raise awareness of both figures and their visions as well as to motivate more young Indonesians to become teachers, Faculty of Education at Sampoerna University held “Kartini Dewantara Festival” in Jakarta on May 4th-5th, 2019 which highlighted the role of women in the age of Education 4.0. There were 125 participants, who were teachers, lecturers, education practitioners and so on.

Speaking as one of the keynote speakers at Education Sharing Network (ESN) Seminar which was part of the festival was Najelaa Shihab (the founder of Sekolah Cikal). “Education gives opportunities to women to express themselves,” she said. “And it makes education become the first and convenient field for women to seek career and developing opportunities. As shown by Kartini in the past, it inspired women nowadays to pursue an equitable education as what the men do. Meanwhile, the learning process and the assessment of the learning are still not women-friendly. Therefore, it needs us to work together for the betterment of education Indonesia,” Najeela argued.

Another speaker on stage to share her views on the issue was Maria Harfanti, Miss Indonesia 2015 (runner-up of Miss World 2015). Having founded Yayasan Bangun Sekolah, she learns the importance of having a proper education for everyone regardless of their gender, economic status, and so forth. She affirmed the close ties, saying,“Women and education are closely related. The role of women has a strong impact on improving the quality of education in Indonesia.”

To conclude the festival, the list of winners of three competitions held previously was announced. The winner of Kartini’s Letter Reading Competition was SMA 1 Kanisius. Meanwhile, Ridwan Agus Tesyah of SMAN 1 Leuwiliang secured the top spot at the Speech Competition and Dhimas Ramaditya Harpanri won the Photography contest. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

SU to Host “HSBC Business Case Competition 2019”

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3060,3059,3057,3078,3076,3077″ layout=”4″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]

To prepare millennials for business challenges in the new era, Putra Sampoerna Foundation (PSF) and PT Bank HSBC Indonesia (HSBC Indonesia) held “HSBC Business Case Competition 2019” on 29 April 2019 at Sampoerna University, L’Avenue, South Jakarta. In its sixth year, the competition shows the commitment of both entities to building innovative future talents equipped with the skill sets to solve real management cases in the corporate world.

The young generation as the nation’s successor plays a key role in tackling business challenges in the new era. According to World Bank data in October 2018, Indonesia is ranked number 87 out of 157 countries around the world in the Human Capital Index (HCI). Meanwhile, our neighboring countries Singapore and Malaysia are ranked 11th and 33rd. World Bank also considers the need to improve human capital quality to strengthen the nation’s potential.

At this year’s HSBC Business Case Competition, Dr. Wahyoe Soedarmono (Head of Management Study Program, Sampoerna University) presented “Recognizing Innovative Ways of Working” seminar discussing the current trends and work culture found not only in progressive new companies but are now also applied in corporations and banking industry.

“We hope that this seminar can paint a real picture of the corporate world the culture that’s adjusted to the preferences of today’s workforce,” Wahyoe explained.

President Director of PT Bank HSBC Indonesia Sumit Dutta said, “With technology developing at a rapid pace, a range of skills is now needed to succeed in the workplace. HSBC Business Case Competition bridges the academic world faced by students with the real problems of the corporate world.”

Further, he stated the goal is that participants understand and are better prepared to face corporate challenges in the new era. “Through this competition, the participants will be guided and developed to be able to think critically so that they can provide solutions to real global-scale case studies of the business world,” Dutta added.

The participants were trained to improve special skills useful for future roles. These skills include the ability to think critically, analytically, creatively, innovatively and communicatively, with adequate presentation skills.

HSBC Business Case Competition is a prestigious event for undergraduate students from economics and business faculties from various leading universities in Indonesia. This year, there were 15 university representative teams from the Greater Jakarta area, Yogyakarta, Bandung, and Surabaya, involving judges from the corporate executives and experts.

“As the winner, a team representing Universitas Prasetya Mulya with their “Brains on Fire” business plan would represent Indonesia against winning teams from Asia Pacific countries and beyond in the International Business Case Competition in Hong Kong in June 2019.”

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Sampoerna University Won Five Best Presenter Awards in the 4th Annual Applied Science & Engineering Conference (AASEC) 2019

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3049,3051,3052,3048″ layout=”4″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]On April 24th, 2019, ten students and five lecturers of Sampoerna University participated in the 4th Annual Applied Science & Engineering Conference (AASEC) at Aston Hotel Denpasar, Bali.

With “Integrating Innovations in Science and Engineering among Young Researchers” as the grand theme, the conference was a prestigious national event. There were more than 1000 abstracts presented by experts, researchers, and students from leading universities in Indonesia, from Universitas Indonesia to Institut Teknologi Bandung. In addition to these universities, representatives of Indonesia’s prominent research institutions in Indonesia were also present, i.e. the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), and Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN).

“This was an excellent opportunity for me to learn from a scientific circle full of knowledge and experience, as I’ve always dreamed of becoming a world-class scientist in the future,” said Yheni Mulyaningsih, a Mechanical Engineering student who was named one of the best presenters at the conference.

Sampoerna University also brought home another four awards in the best presenter category. Gemintang Bening (Industrial Engineering), Sepwin Nosten Sitompul, M.Sc. (Science lecturer), Sri Susilawati Islam, M.T. (Industrial Engineering lecturer), and Dr. Farid Triawan (Head of Mechanical Engineering Study Program).

At Sampoerna University, we fully support our students and lecturers to attend national and international conferences or seminars. This helps them acquire as much knowledge as possible from scholars and scientists from around the country and the world. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Storytelling Techniques with 360 Cameras at “Akademi VR”

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3025,3024,3023,3022,3021,3020″ layout=”3″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]At Sampoerna University, we always strive to be more than a campus for our students. As a learning community, we also open opportunities for everyone to learn together from the best minds.

Bearing this spirit in mind, the study program of Visual Communication Design (VCD) recently held a 3-day workshop “Akademi VR” at our L’Avenue campus from 26 to 28 April 2019. This workshop aimed at anyone interested in storytelling with 360 cameras.

“Akademi VR helps participants learn various techniques of storytelling which include production and post-production processes using 360 cameras,” said Tombak Matahari, head of the study program. In the course, according to Tombak ever participant was encouraged to experiment to tell their own stories.

There were 17 participants who sat down to learn together from Festivo (one of the leading virtual reality production houses in Indonesia). In partnerships with Sampoerna University, several experts and practitioners of Festivo spoke and guided all participants who consisted of design lecturers, broadcast professionals, and movie makers from Jakarta and the surrounding areas.

Further, Tombak said that Virtual Reality (VR) was chosen as it is a new way of telling stories around us and to entertain audiences. To be defined simply, VR is an interactive computer-generated experience taking place within a simulated environment. And 360 VR video is only one of the ongoing trends right now. The industry is increasingly promising, as it is projected to be on track to generate $26.89 billion in revenue by 2022 as reported by Zion Market Research on February 14, 2018.

Because the level offered here was advanced, the topics covered were, therefore, more complete and complex. At first, participants were introduced to Immersive Media. They were also taught scriptwriting for VR, VR shooting techniques, stitching, editing programming, publishing to VR headset, to screening. At the end of the workshop, participants were allowed to evaluate what they had learned. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Extensive Reading: When Reading Can Be Fun and Enjoyable

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”2981,2982,2980,2979,2978,2977″ layout=”3″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]To date, reading culture has never been part of Indonesian society. In our schools, reading is also aimed at achieving the best score. This is why reading is almost always seen as a boring activity instead of an activity for pleasure.

In order to change this situation, Sampoerna University’s Center for Literacy at Faculty of Education invited a couple of influential academicians specializing in extensive reading from Extensive Reading Foundation based in Japan and some other Indonesian members of Extensive Reading Association on Saturday (4/27/ 2019) at Sampoerna University. Titled “Extensive Reading: Why and How”, the workshop was attended by many teachers from high schools and other universities in Jakarta and the adjacent areas.

Living currently in Japan, Prof. Marc Helgesen, Ph.D. came to share his insights and experiences. Here is the excerpt of the interview with the American-born scholar who is also a Board Member of Extensive Reading Foundation, Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University, Japan.

“What is the ultimate aim of the workshop?”

Marc Helgesen (MH): “We try to share in a very understandable way. ER is reading a lot of easy, enjoyable books. I want to share some of the research behind ER. We show teachers how to do it in their classrooms. This way, more students in Indonesia can acquire better level of reading fluency.”

“You mentioned earlier that Indonesia has no culture of reading. Why is it so?”

MH : “For historical reasons, it has never been part of Indonesian culture. There are things we can change. Bahasa Jawa and Bahasa Indonesia have no reading-for-pleasure culture.

Partially as a result of that, English is only taught as a classroom subject. We read for grades. There is plenty of evidence that if you do extensive reading, grades go up. Because you’re immersed in the meaning as opposed to studying separate items pieces of vocabulary and grammar.”

“How can everyone start with Extensive Reading (ER)?”

MH: “In ER, start with easy and interesting texts. Just like when we study our mother tongue. Start with picture books so that they get excited with the stories and learn and remember them. So they get the repetition they need. This is how ER is taught in a level appropriate way.

Test-oriented cultures like Indonesia and pretty much all of Asia focus too much on solving problems in exams. That doesn’t really help students in the long term and only helps get through tests. That doesn’t help us apply the knowledge.

So when we talk a lot about 21st-century skills (e.g. critical thinking, collaboration, creativity), we cannot memorize your way to that. You have to have the foundation to master all those skills. And the foundation is extensive reading skills.”

“How is your experience of teaching Extensive Reading in non-English-speaking countries like Indonesia?”

MH: “The learning processes is easy for speakers of Indo-European. However, for Asian speakers, because Asian languages were not of the same language family with English, the ‘jump’ is so difficult.

The other language specialists from RELO (Regional English Language Office) of the United States State Department have started this. About more than 20 years ago, extensive reading was unusual in Japan. Now it’s everywhere because a group of us set out to do research, publicize research, hold workshops for teachers, conferences to reach classroom teachers at every level. It made a difference.

Last year, creative readers have surpassed course books’ in revenue that a large publishing company generates in these recent years.  It shows that there is an improvement in ER.

We also have several Indonesian teachers in various universities. They have examples from their own classrooms. This does make sense. I hope that we can share the success.

These are skills that Indonesia needs in the time of the burgeoning economy. Jobs in the 21st century will require high-level thinking skills, among which is ER skills.”

“Should young students read canons or the simplified versions of them?”

MH: “Indonesia has a history that reading English means translating it. Students begin learning English in junior high school in Indonesia. It starts as a grammar-based class. They didn’t look like anything like natural conversations or natural texts. Just grammar practice but they don’t learn how to carry on discourses, spoken conversations. They study words and grammar in isolation.

Also, because students are in junior and senior high school they have to take entrance exams. That is a different kind of task. The task was not learning English to communicate but to pass tests.

That is one reason why in East Asian countries extensive reading takes off in the universities because they already pass the entrance exams. Now they can make use of those words and grammar. And they can start working on the fluency.

So when we are in high school, everything was supposed to be difficult. English is like education, work harder. If you’re not sweating, you’re not doing it. No! I don’t think learning English is supposed to be hard.”

How can we make our children love reading in this digital age when smartphones are more enticing than books?”

MH: “It’s no easy task but to start, let’s not consider phones as enemies. There are downsides of phone but most of the time actually when we use phones, we are reading something. Reading online and offline doesn’t really matter. But there is research that shows that people actually prefer longer things in paper. Even digital natives prefer reading books for longer stories. Maybe the enemy is attention span and multitasking. So if you read, let yourself focus on the material by turning off any notifications.”

 

Besides Helgesen, Thomas Robb, Ph.D. (English language specialist, chair of Extensive Reading Foundation) was presenting “Implementing an Extensive Reading Program: Opportunities and Challenges”.

The workshop was concluded by several sessions showcasing case studies in Indonesia. Christina Lhaksmita, Ed.M. of Sanata Dharma University, Anita Kurniawati, M. Hum. of  Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana, Athriyana S. Pattiwael, M. Hum. of Universitas Kristen Krida Wacana, and Dr. Vera Syamsi, M. Hum. of Sampoerna University talked more about how to bring the books back into the classroom. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Finding Mathematicians through Realistic Mathematics Education

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”2973,2972,2971,2970″ layout=”4″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]Associate Prof. Maarten Dolk of Utrecht University believes in the importance of Realistic Mathematics in mathematics education. There are many ways to teach children. Many teachers help children find the right answers. They are extremely helpful for the children they teach. But the problem is students are getting too dependent on their teachers. Teachers always give directions and students, on the other hand, expect guidance. So children are not really learning mathematics.

“So what I think is important is how we encourage children to become young mathematicians,” Prof. Dolk stated Friday (4/26/2019) during his talk at Realistic Mathematics Education Workshop at Sampoerna University.

His guided reinvention approach is unique and different from the conventional ones. “We don’t focus on procedures. They focus on the ongoing development of mathematical theories, by children themselves,” he emphasized.

In his view, teachers are to design problems with contexts as such so that children can realize what they are doing. Based on contexts, children acquire a better understanding.

“Problems are solvable by all children in a class. They can solve problems by means of using tools or drawing on paper. Some also can work on problems in an abstract manner,” he elaborated.

This way, children will ‘own’ their mathematics, which is less possible to achieve in answer-oriented classes. With this approach, students’ critical thinking ability and creativity are also stimulated better.

The workshop was packed as a number of students of other universities and teachers of 19 schools in Jakarta and the greater area sat down together and learned this approach. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Understanding the Basics of Social Photography

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”3015,3014,3013,3012″ layout=”4″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]Photography is a vast discipline that has developed for many years. Among many subcategories of it is social photography. Roughly defined, it is a type of photography that focuses upon the technology, interaction, and activities of individuals taking photographs.

From American photographer Galen Stolee, a number of students of Sampoerna University learned directly how to take quality photographs that can tell stories on Friday (4/26/2019) at Sampoerna University campus. Stolee himself is currently pursuing a Ph.D. degree at Harvard University, majoring in Social Anthropology.

Based on the submitted photographs at Sampoerna University Library‘s Social Photography Seminar, Mr. Stolee shared his tips and tricks with students on how to produce photographs with messages in them.

The first is overcoming shyness. He recognized the problem as a novice photographer years ago, too. “I’m an introverted person as well. So I tended to take photos from far away without the object’s knowledge. But over time I had to overcome that shyness as I have to talk to people and get permission that I have taken their pictures,” he said.

The second tip is proper lighting. Never take photographs with poor lighting as it only takes away the beauty of objects. “Taking photos at night is a challenge but I like the fact that it pulls us in the middle, where the source of light lies. It’s well done, beautiful and tells a nice story,” Stolee commented on a photo titled ‘Juragan Pentol‘.

Next, make sure a photo can really convey the main message or theme. This is also a strong reason why he named Anggun Siska Hamidah’s photo the best among others. “The photo took the question of the leadership and social responsibility theme. And she did something very different and abstract.” The photo shows three little boys waving hands to the sky, symbolizing the infinite possibility in the future.

A strong caption will not hurt! Stolee sees a caption as a more detailed explanation of a photograph. “Anggun’s photo has a compelling caption that I love so much. It says: ‘Hello, future leaders. Spell our names: Honesty, Integrity, Responsibility’,” he added.

For students who want to pursue a photography career, Stolee advised, “Though the skills of photography are still in high demand, there is a lot of competition right now as everyone has a camera. But if you’re really into photography, consider combining it with some other skill sets because it cannot stand alone. You can combine it with journalism skills, social media skills, and other skills that the world needs.” (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

SU Student’s Startup Won Best Solution for Youth Employment

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” images=”2962,2961,2960″ layout=”3″ gallery_style=”1″ load_in_animation=”none” img_size=”600×400″][vc_column_text]Pandoo, an Indonesian startup co-founded by Luh Rika of Faculty of Engineering and Technology has recently gained a victory in “Youth Co:Lab Summit” for the Asia Pacific region. The startup focuses on digital marketing of tourism in rural areas in Indonesia.

“We realize there are numerous villages in Indonesia that have much potential in tourism but they have to struggle with marketing,” she mentioned the underlying problem to address.

Pandoo has started making some efforts to market some villages as attractive tourism destinations. Her team at Pandoo has been developing a tourism village in Mount Bunder, Bogor, West Java. The mountain is less popular than Puncak but has a lot to offer.

“In Youth Co:Lab Summit, my startup Pandoo got a chance to represent Indonesia and was named the Best Solution for Youth Employment (Youth Employment Potential Award) Winner,” Luh Rika told her experience.

Pandoo was one of seven winning startups, i.e. Aeroroots (Nepal), MUNE (Korea), AI Sight (Hongkong), Tasty Kitchen Collective (Fiji Island), Deaf Tawk (the Phillipines), and Avijatrik (Bangladesh). “My team won the title over 34 selected startups out of 500 applicants,”

Held from 2 to 6 April 2019 in Hanoi, Vietnam, the entrepreneurship competition is part of “Youth Co:Lab Indonesia”, one of the programs initiated by UNDP (United Nation Development Program) and Citi Foundation, in which Luh Rika had also participated. In Indonesia, Youth Co: Lab is under the supervision of Innovative Financing Lab of UNDP and supported by BEKRAF, Citi Foundation, Hubud, For Good, etc.

“I hope my achievement can inspire other young students in campus to improve their achievements as well,” she said. (*/)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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